Tag Archives: writing

…and Summer is On Her Way Out the Door


Autumn on the land

Autumn is just beginning to creep into my kingdom. A few trees are already showing signs of less sunlight and cooler nights. I don’t know if the hurricanes far to the south are pulling moisture out of the air where I live, but the early morning dew on the grass sparkles until about a half hour after sunrise, and then it is G-O-N-E.

Now, whether or not i got anything done at all is a good question, but I can look back on what I’ve done all summer and say, yes, I did quite a bit, but I neglected my very own blog in favor of posting articles on a good friend’s spot, with his permission, of course.  At the same time, i paid attention to my stories, getting print copies done for editing, digging up old starts to others, and somehow organizing a mess to be less disorganized.

You do get scattered sometimes, without realizing it. And all those resolutions you may have made on New Year’s Day – well, they kind of went south, too, because they weren’t printed out and stuck to the fridge door with a magnet.

Life gets in the way, as do hurricanes and tornadoes, but somehow, we just pull ourselves up and move on.  No, I did not get hit by either of those. We had high volume rain that resulted in massive flooding, but I live on a hilltop and always stock my pantry and freezer and keep bottled water on hand, just in case. The whole year has been like that for some of us. As I do live on a hilltop, the water all ran away from me, but roads around my area were blocked for a couple of weeks while the flooding drained away into overburdened creeks and sluggish rivers, and finally, out to the main river that runs into the Mississippi further to the south. Then the village I live in went to the trouble of putting in larger drains and sewers to act as a flood preventive measure, against the next deluge.

And life went on.

My sunflowers grew to the size of small trees, originally planted from sunflower seeds in spilled birdfood. I found myself to be hosting two mated pairs of goldfinches who have made themselves fat on the seeds of those plants. It will soon be over. The males will change to drab traveling colors and the sunflower jungle will come down. The nights turned cooler, the rains still come and there are three hurricanes (Irma and Jose in the Atlantic, and Katia over by Yucatan in the Gulf of Mexico) now threatening the southeastern US.

I never make any “resolutions” because they just lie forgotten six weeks later. I made a list of things I wanted to get done: pay off bills, keep the larder stocked with good stuff, take more walks, focus on writing and do NOT whine about what I can’t do. Focus on what I CAN do.

That’;s what’s ahead: what I CAN do.

What I want to do is more research for science fiction, to make it parallel current findings in astrophysics and astronomy, although these findings keep changing sometimes daily. We keep finding that we know a lot less than we thought we did. Somehow, 16th century astronomy seems simpler, doesn’t it?

If sci-fi is your venue, You can find an almost daily article on the most recent stuff at Centauri Dreams.

You can also get a weekly e-mail update from Sky and Telescope, another magazine online.  There are so many discoveries being made, thanks to those small probes orbiting other planets and their satellites in our solar system that what they report now will be useful in the future.

If, on the other hand, you’re interested in romance novels, you might want to check all those hundreds of blogs that offer recipes of every possible kind, just to give your heroine a chance to fix a ridiculously romantic dinner for someone special.

You might also look up Renfests and Renaissance Faires if there are any near you, and if you want to spend some time hobnobbing with members of a royal court or the Court of the Fey.

In other words, just because fall is coming and the geese are nearing the end of their training flight programs, and fattening up for the flights south, it does not mean you have to give up anything at all. Birding hikes are a terrific way to learn about the natural world around you. It’s amazing what we learn on a simple weekend hike from an informed guide. No, you do not have to live in the country to do this. A lot of cities do the same thing, and there is safety in groups, too.

I strongly recommend that you take a camera of some kind, partly to record what you see, and partly to support your efforts to make your stories more real to your readers. Pay attention to the world around you, to the sun’s rays coming in through your kitchen window, and the noises from outside your living space.

I’m eagerly waiting for the first frost this year.

 

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Filling in


...continuing along the path

…continuing along the path

I’ve been filling in for a sick friend on his blog, along with other people who either sent me stuff to post for them, or posted their own articles themselves.  It’s a popular blog that gets a lot of visitors, which means that  a hiatus, however, brief, can lose the audience’s interest.  People were somewhat bewildered when on a Monday morning, only two of the usual posts appeared, and after a little reflection, I posted one of my own articles to distract the audience from their ‘what’s happening here?’ concerns.  Just pick up the walking staff and carry on.

Fortunately, I had access and didn’t have to ask for permission to post an article.  As a result, the sigh of relief was tangible. After a couple of days, I put a routine together which the audience seemed to like, found plenty of material to provide grit for their grindstone – that’s a metaphor, really – and things went on as before.

That was the best lesson I’ve ever had in making something happen. If you want it, you have to earn it, whatever ‘it’ is. No one is just going to hand ‘it’ to you or do the work for you.  I’ve said before that we all want to be heard. The reason that some blogs prosper and generate a large following is that the blog owner focuses on what he/she wants to present and forges ahead, regardless of the size of the audience, and continues to make posts whether anyone reads them or not. At some point, the blog begins to get noticed more and more often, and finally, like a waiting daisy, begins to bloom.

Now, in my case, minding the store or guarding the fortress while someone else is out with the sickie-poos is not a big deal, but does it interfere with continuing to work on the novels I’ve started? The simple answer to that is ‘No, it does not’.  There was plenty of time available for me to reflect on what I want to do, where I really want those stories to go, what the Big Bad Guys may be like, what parts I neglected. Now that the owner of the other blog is getting back on his feet, some of the problems I was facing have been solved and I can work on that. I’ll still be posting stuff on his blog because it helps him out, but I won’t be neglecting my own at all.

I never got around to making a list of subjects to cover, and I’m not going to do that, either. It’s better to have a general idea and allow it to find its own path to follow. This is, after all, about writing and the process of writing, how we communicate with others, and what it means to be persistent, to be able to stick to it until a project is finished. It isn’t as easy as it seemed in the beginning.

How you set your own up and what you want to do is up to you, but a staying audience, one that comes back repeatedly to see what you said today or yesterday, takes a while to build.  The extremely small number of people who have had instant hits should be a clear indicator of what it takes to build an audience.

In view of that, and taking into account what I got out of minding someone else’s store for a while, I have a better idea about what I want to do here.  Let’s consider it a new way to keep a journal.

Spring will be here soon.  Be ready for it.  Stick around.

 

Winter doldrums? Keep yourself busy


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Winter is definitely upon us. In some parts of the country, the weather is warmer than usual, rainy, sloppy and downright annoying. In other places, people are so buried in snow that they want to move some place where there is none at all, ever.

If you’re shut indoors, this is a good time to have a pile of things to do, especially in regard to any and all of your creative endeavors. Seriously, writing in a coffee shop with lots of people around you making background noise sounds like a great idea, but the shop closes at some point and you have to go home. Maybe forming a circle of friends who can meet at your place, if you have room, and just yak about writing or do some writing exercises like Rita Mae Brown offers in her books will spur you to do more than you’d planned to do. Remember, February is coming and romantic poems are always in vogue for that month.

My car doesn’t want to start, so that means that if I need to run an errand, I have to walk a half mile to the bus stop and when the weather is crappy, I don’t want to. I’d rather stay home, make treats, do some brainstorming, and work on current projects. And I have plenty of stuff on hand to make treats.

I’m filling in, along with a couple of other people, for a sick friend on his blog. It’s keeping me as busy as a bee in a field of clover, and it’s a lot of fun. I did it out of instinct, because everyone wondered what was going on. The gathering place was not being manned. It just seemed like a good idea to pick up the reins and keep going, and it has worked out quite well.

It doesn’t mean I’m setting my own stuff aside. I still focus on my own work, still feed the birds and the squirrels who steal bird food, and still fix meals and make cookies.

There is no real reason to stop working on your creative stuff, ever. If you need treats to keep your brainstorming going and you don’t want to buy them, there are recipes all over the internet that are easy to follow. It’s well worth your time to do these things for yourself, and besides that, it will probably impress your friends, too. And I can’t think of anything better than being in the 2nd floor apartment on the street side, and looking out at snow falling, while you have a tray full of cookies in the oven, just waiting for you to take them out and finish the entire batch.

Who said winter has to be dull and boring?

Starting Fresh


white-throated-sparrow-nirvana-shot-1-12-2016

Here we go. It’s a brand new year. We have all kinds of things to think about. We’re always asked what resolutions we’ve made for the new year.

Well, how about if we don’t make resolutions, but instead, come up with a bunch of things we want to do this year? Why not some goals to work toward, instead of resolutions which will be ignored from Day One and never met? It’s much easier to have a list of goals to meet, tasks to complete, “things to do” this year, and scratch each one off as you go than it is to try to remember some ‘resolution’ you set for yourself and then cast aside.

So here are mine:

Shoot more pictures
Finish current novels – I have three I’m working on.
Write some more poetry – that’s one I let go but I still have that on my plate.
Get the confounded clutter out of my house
Cook a lot more new stuff, something like crepes with beef and mushrooms
Try one new dish each month. Just one should be enough. No, I don’t like squid. Tried it. Don’t like it. But I gave it a shot.
Read books by authors who are not in vogue any more. For instance, H.M. Tomlinson, a journalist who covered World War I, is a good reference for that period.

Keeping it simple makes it easier to get these things done, and when you’re done with one, you can scratch it off that list on the fridge door.

The bird in the photo is a white-throated sparrow. It’s not a rare bird, but it is rare in my area, because its habitat area is mostly the eastern side of the Appalachians. Glad I had the camera handy, charged and ready.

Happy New Year!!!

A Gift for the Coming Year


A long trail ahead of me...

A long trail ahead of me…

Well, by golly, I’ve been slipping again! My bad. No Christmas cookies for me!

But this is what happens when you get busy, working on things that do have importance to you, and finishing my current book projects is very important to me. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to take something from start to finish, and then go back and review it.

“Oh, but wait!” you say. “I have all these ideas and they get to a certain point and then nothing happens.”

I know. It happens to me all the time. I’ve spent untold hours coming up with ideas for stories, summaries, blurbs and titles, and wondering if they’d ever be finished. I have starts that stopped, and summaries that cry out for expansion into full-blown stories. Is there enough for a full-length book? Oh, who cares? It’s the thought that counts. The idea that came up on paper sits waiting in a dusty notebook, or an unsearched file on your hard drive, wondering if anyone cares about it enough to finish what you started. I knew somebody way back when who had a storage box full of notes and ideas and did nothing with them. In fact, she was so certain they weren’t worth the bother that she threw them away.

Come on, now! These are your babies, your brain’s offspring, your source of joy and pride and it does not matter one tiny bit that they’ve been sitting in a bin on a shelf in your coat closet for years or months, or just until you ‘have the time’.
Let me tell you something. The ‘time’ will never arrive on its own. The ‘babies’ will never become full-fledged, completed stories of any length by themselves. The offspring of your overactive imagination will spend eternity in a coffee shop, wondering if you are ever going to show up and get this show on the road.

They can’t live without your interference. This is how it works. If you can spare 20 minutes for a shower, a half hour to an hour at the gym, can’t you spare an hour and a half with one of those crazy ideas you wrote down on a note pad ten years ago?

I spent a good deal of time during my workaday life coming up with ideas for stories. I wrote down as many as I could on a pad of paper, and later typed them up on 3-hole punched paper, and kept everything in notebooks. When I moved twelve years ago, the volume of stuff I had put together as starters was huge and no, I did not throw out any of it. I simply kept it stored and here it is now, in my house, waiting in the storage boxes and notebooks it was stored in so long ago, waiting to be brought into existence. And I have all sorts of distractions to keep my attention off my ideas and stories and keep me from completing these things, but over the past summer, with an enormous distraction that turned into nothing at the end, I persevered and am moving ahead.

Because it’s Christmas, my gift to someone who thinks s/he has no time to do this kind of work is to say the exact opposite: you do have the time. You just think you don’t. The only thing standing in your way is you.

There are all sorts of books on how to do a good job of storytelling, and likewise, all sorts of books with exercises to nudge you along the writer’s path. But reaching the goal at the end of the path, completing the story, is something you have to do yourself.

Here’s how you do this:

1 – complete the story, period. Do not make corrections.
2 – print it out on 3-hole punched paper and store it in physical form in a 3-ring binder.
3 – put it away for several months.

On a cold, rainy day in the spring, when you don’t want to be outside, fix yourself a big pot of hot tea or coffee, get some cookies or other snacks, and reread what you wrote. Ignore the mistakes, just read it. If it still seems worth the time and effort it took, it’s a keeper. This is when you proofread and edit it, polish it, make the ‘mystery’ connections work, and decide whether or not to expand it to a lengthier form, such as a full-length novel, or keep it as a short story or novella. You may see the possibilities for a series of stories in it when you reread it after some time away from it.

I found that to be true for many of the summaries that I created a long time ago: they could be full-length novels as well as short stories.

It was up to me to complete them.

There is always something that will distract you. There is always someone who will be negative about what you’ve done. There is plenty of tremulous self-doubt floating through the air, enough to sink anyone into a Well of Gloom. These are people whose lives are limited by restaurant menus and coffee shop couches.

Writing is not about gaining fame and fortune. It’s about creating something out of whole cloth, floating moonbeams, and squeaky closet monsters. It’s your imagination at work, the part of you that wondered if you’d ever get to go to the Moon or find out that the guy who sells watermelons out of his pickup truck is really a philanthropist with a hobby that lets him meet people.

Now go on: get those ideas down on paper, filed on a jump drive, backed up on a terabyte peripheral drive, and printed and stored in a physically tangible notebook.

And have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, because a year from now, you may have a LOT of stuff done!

The End of Summer…


It really is the end of summer now.  In the Pagan/Wiccan calendar, Lunasagh marks the beginning of the harvest of foodstuffs to be stored and used through the fall and winter into Spring.  In the old days, when icehouses stored winter ice cut out of ponds, lakes and rivers for use in the summer, people would find themselves coming to the end of their supply of ice.  In truly hot, humid weather, that could become a burden.

If you pay attention to the rising and setting of the Sun and the Moon, then you will mark the Moon’s position in her relationship to the Sun through the seasons.  Why bring this up?  Partly because most of my life until I was an adult was spent on a farm or in farming country. I’m still conscious of the seasonal changes. The Farmer’s Almanac and the Old Farmer’s Almanac (two separate publications) have online presences as well as published print editions that give weather forecasts, tidal changes, the phases of the Moon, the planets in their various constellations, and all the other things that people who work in a ‘natural’ setting will notice more than those working indoors in an office.  There is an article in my local newspaper noting that fewer and fewer people, adults and children alike, are spending time outdoors in the fresh air and sunshine for various reasons, and it does have a very real affect on their emotional state when they shut themselves up in buildings.  They become more fractious, contentious and sometimes aggressive.

I love fantasy stories. Good fantasy storytelling is always something I look for.  The things I’ve already mentioned – seasonal awareness, the effects of being outdoors versus indoors all the time, noticing changes in the sky in daytime and at night – are essential to making your people believable to your readers.  This is what Tolkien did when he created the Universe of Middle-Earth.

I also love good science fiction.  When Anne McCaffrey invented the world of PERN, she paid attention to those very things. Her people had to do so, or suffer the consequences.  It’s as necessary to fantasy as it is to science fiction, both of which I grew up reading, and wondering if I could come close to telling tales that resonated with people the way the stories of J.R.R.Tolkien and C.S. Lewis and Robert Heinlein did.

If you are going to invent a Universe to populate with dragons and sea nymphs and Sea Kobolds (look that one up, it’s interesting), then I encourage you to fully understand that Universe yourselves.  If you are going to write fantastical tales of Knights lost in a wilderness, find out why they are there in the first place, and then tell us what happened and how they’ll get out of this dilemma.  How many will survive? What are they facing?

I have a good friend working on his first novel, trying to make it as good as he can, so my part in it is to ask him questions.  What? Who? Where? When? How? Why?  He will send me his chapters and I will send him mine. His is a world that is unique and has not been done before – or if it has been done, it did not last because it was not done very well by someone else and he’s found his stride in creating it.

I apologize for taking so long to write another post, but this is part of what happens when you do want to take your story from start to finish.  Your blog posts become unintentionally sporadic. You forget to fix lunch and you drink ice tea (when it’s hot) instead of having breakfast, and find that you’ve shrunk a full dress size without trying.  No harm in that. Just take your vitamins, get a ham and cheese sandwich and some grapes, and keep pecking the keys.  And if you get stuck, don’t worry about it.  Have something else you can turn to. And get outside in the fresh air occasionally. It will do you a world of good.

 

Storytelling ingredients… just like making cookies


If you’re human, you have a favorite dish.  Doesn’t matter what it is. It’s your comfort food, your go-to when you don’t want to be bothered with choosing, or what you remember the most often when you’re away from home and want something really good.  It may be simple and easy to fix, or complicated and time-consuming, but it’s the one thing you turn to when all other dishes fail.

This applies to creating stories, too. They have characters, places, narrative, beginnings, action, middles and endings.  Those are ingredients, and how you treat them determines how the story will proceed. You may have a favorite genre, such as steampunk or Regency romance or mystery. All have specific ingredients or qualities that make them part of a genre. You can make all these ingredients into something as complex as beef bourguignon (beef burgundy), or you can make your story as simple and familiar as mac and cheese.

I like making chocolate chip cookies.  I have the Tollhouse recipe memorized. I could make a batch in my sleep. But I have a secret ingredient that makes them more than just regular chocolate chip cookies. Well, I have two, but I’ll come to that.

The recipe itself is uncomplicated. The ingredients are simple: eggs, butter, sugar, brown sugar, vanilla, flour, baking soda, salt, chocolate chips.

But let’s dig into that list of ingredients. Instead of just brown sugar, I use dark brown sugar. Why? It has extra molasses, more than light brown sugar. More flavor. I use vanilla, a particular brand that seems to have a brighter flavor than regular vanilla. I use unbleached flour. The chocolate chips are heavier in cacao than the other chocolate chips, but they don’t cost any more than the others. I want some serious chocolate chip cookies, so I add a little more than just the usual ingredients.

There’s your story: a little more than just the usual ingredients.  You add bits and pieces of information here and there, like rich, dark chocolate chips scattered through cookie dough, that draw your readers into the story.  You describe neighborhoods and countryside and villages, cities and towns as if you’ve lived there half your life.  You know the people down the street and next door, because you invented them.

Oh, but wait! Your people don’t live on a street or in a neighborhood. They live on a large island with an inlet bay that nearly splits the island in two, and the two populated halves of the island have been fighting over fishing and sailing rights to that water body for longer than human memory.

The neighborhood and the island are the same thing as the cookie dough in my cookies. They hold the chocolate chips, vanilla, and sugars that enrich the story. They make it whole and believable.  You should be able to stand at the head of the inlet bay in the center of that island or in the middle of the park on the square in that neighborhood and give me, your reader, an idea of what it’s like to live there and who those other people are, just as you know the ingredients in your favorite recipe so well that you can recount them from memory.

Your cookbooks, to use a metaphor, are easy to find: the Chicago Manual of Style. Strunk & White’s Elements of Style.  The Oxford Dictionary. Roget’s Thesaurus. Since there is a wealth of material available online for reference, you can search by subject matter. Better yet, you can go to the library and find even more stuff in the stacks.  Do not ignore the work of people you never heard of. They may add more than just exotic flavor to your stories.

If you’re still in school, there should be an English teacher somewhere who may give you extra credit for work you do outside of class and who may be able to push you into doing better work than you ever thought you could.

Now, with any recipe or any story, there are requirements you have to meet. Recipes require specific ingredients and specific methods. If you don’t follow those guides, the recipe fails.  There’s nothing wrong with trying to vary the recipe, but the first few times you use it, follow the instructions.  Get familiar with it, and then make the variations to suit yourself.

The same holds true of a story, whether it’s one page, a novella, or a full-length novel in a series. It has to have a start, middle, and ending. The characters really do need a conflict of some kind, something that needs resolution, and the ending should satisfy the needs of the characters. This is how stories work.  It does your reader no good to have wonderful character descriptions (midnight-dark 80% cacao chocolate chips) if they don’t do anything.  Where’s the conflict, or the problem, for the characters to solve? What’s the ending? What’s the argument?

If you have all the cookie dough ingredients standing by, including that bottle of real Madagascar bourbon vanilla, but you never get around to mixing them into cookie dough, you’ll never have a batch of chocolate chip cookies.  But you can mix the dough, refrigerate or freeze it, and come back to it later, and you just might find that setting it aside for a while gives you a better batch of cookies.

If you create a catalog of characters, put them to work.  If you can’t figure out where the story goes, that’s fine. Set it aside. Do something else and come back to the story later. But don’t throw out what you’ve already created.  Let it ferment, and see what happens to those characters. Give them something to do.

Oh, the two secret ingredients in my cookies?  The classic recipe calls for one teaspoon of vanilla.  I use two teaspoons of vanilla, plus the dark brown sugar instead of light brown.  Go ahead:  Hand me a plate of chocolate chip cookies and put me into the middle of the story.  Draw me in.

Just add a little more flavor.